Friday, 17 August 2018 00:00

Custom orthotics (shoe inserts) should be replaced periodically. They need to fit properly to give you the best results. Protect your feet and ankles.

Monday, 13 August 2018 00:00

Foot ulcers may develop as a result of poorly managed diabetes. The skin will typically disintegrate, and the layers underneath will become exposed. Common areas on the foot where this condition may develop include the balls of the feet and under the big toe. In patients with severe foot ulcers, the bones of the feet may often become affected and may generally produce pain and discomfort. Research has shown the importance in keeping as much weight as possible off of your feet; this reportedly prevents further infections from developing. Wearing shoe inserts or diabetic shoes may be beneficial in providing additional protection the feet may need for proper healing. If you are afflicted with a foot ulcer, please consult with a podiatrist for information on correct  treatment remedies.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. Amy Dunetz from Amy Dunetz, DPM, MS. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a nondiabetic. 

What is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Aventura and Davie, FL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Monday, 06 August 2018 00:00

Pain is typically felt on the foot near the pinky toe if you are afflicted with cuboid syndrome. Additional symptoms that can be experienced may include the area appearing red, difficulty in walking due to a lack of mobility, or possible swelling. One of the most common causes of cuboid syndrome developing may be due to ankle sprains. This type of injury may put excessive pressure on the ligaments and ankle bones, possibly resulting in the cuboid bone dislocating and moving outward. If you are afflicted with this condition, you may find moderate relief in elevating your foot, which may aid in reducing swelling. It’s suggested to schedule a consultation with a podiatrist for additional information and treatment recommendations.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Amy Dunetz from Amy Dunetz, DPM, MS. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Aventura and Davie, FL. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Cuboid Syndrome
Friday, 03 August 2018 00:00

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